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MaSS

stepping stones of maritime history

History

Historical description

Geünieerde Provinciën sailed for the Dutch East India Company (VOC) as a merchant vessel between the Netherlands and the East Indies during the early seventeenth century. She was part of a homebound fleet of three other ships that had departed from Bantam when she was lost. The three other ships were Delft, Gelderland, and Banda, and they were under the command of Pieter Both.

Geünieerde Provinciën sank in June 1615 while at anchor near the Bay of Albion. The fleet had been hit by a hurricane near the west coast of the island of Mauritius. Three out of four of the ships in the fleet were lost during the storm, and only Delft made it home to the Netherlands. Thirty deaths resulted from the storm, among them the commander of the fleet Pieter Both, a former governor of the Dutch East Indies. The highest peak of Mauritius was named after Pieter Both following the disaster.

Pieter Both, commander of the fleet

Pieter Boths peak at Mauritius

Archaeological description

The wreck of Geünieerde Provinciën was found and surveyed in 1990 by a French archaeological team, although no official report has since been published. The government of Mauritius does not recognize the Dutch as the owner of the wreck site, and the site is presently controlled by the Mauritian ministry of culture. While the wreck site is legally protected, it is still under threat by natural erosion, fisherman, and tourism.

Description

 

Type: Dutch East Indiaman (spiegel retourschip)
Built: 1603
Yard: Amsterdam
Chamber: Amsterdam
Tonnage: 700, 350 last
Complement: 160

Status

The ship Geunieerde Provincien was found and surveyed in 1990 by a French archaeological team, although no official report has since been published.

East Indiaman

Roman structures